Sporting, Boxing, Stop for Right-Hand Lead Off, Figure 3, c1890

Sporting, Boxing, Stop for Right-Hand Lead Off, Figure 3, c1890

Regular price $100.00 Sale

Date: c1890 

Paper Size: 188 x 130mm

Print Size: 112 x 97mm

Condition: Good

Technique: Copperplate engraving with later hand colouring

Price: $100

Description: Copperplate engraving with later hand colouring

Provenance

The History of English Sport

The English have always been 'addicted to sport' all through the ages and the games that people played often depended on their status in life.

Upper-class men spent their time at field sports like hunting, fishing, and shooting as many were landowners and were able to host hunting events and shooting parties.

Class distinctions blurred at other forms of sport. Boxing was extremely popular at all levels of society - even though it was forbidden by law. Large crowds turned up to watch prize fights, and betting could be very high.

Most boxing matches in the 1800s were conducted under London Rules which were based on a set of rules laid down by an English boxer, Jack Broughton in 1743.

The basic premise of the Broughton Rules and the subsequent London Prize Ring Rules was that a round in a fight would last until a man went down. 

Everyone watches sport for basically the same reasons today. In the past during Tudor times, it was often to relieve anger and stress. Today, it is more about getting together for fun and relaxation. They watch for entertainment and pleasure

Sports in England have come a long way since the 1400s. They are not nearly as brutal as they used to be, though at times still rough. Rules are now official and are pretty much the same all over the world but the reasons for watching sport are all still the same. They serve as a reason for gatherings and meetings and for recreation.

To learn more about The History of English Sport click here